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Will Eating Eggs Every Day Raise My Cholesterol?

November 21, 2013 by admin in Health News with 51 Comments

The topic of whether eating eggs everyday is good or bad for your health has been an age old breakfast discussion that even your grandparents have an opinion about. It seems that every few years, varying, and at times, even conflicting reports come out, each attesting to having the “latest” and most accurate information about eggs.

Some reports claim that eating an egg everyday is unhealthy while others swear by the actual benefits to be garnered by a daily dose of eggs. Some reports even aver that eating just one to two eggs a day is perfectly alright, only to be contradicted by later testimonies. Needless to say, all these simply add to the confusion regarding the pressing question of whether or not we should eat eggs everyday.

Though this article will not attempt to give you a definitive, final answer with regard to the more scientific aspect of egg-eating, hopefully it will be able to give you a certain understanding of the composition of eggs, of what cholesterol really is, and how your body works so that you may be able to arrive at a well-founded judgment on your own.

Good Cholesterol, Bad Cholesterol

Though it is common knowledge in this day and age that not all cholesterol is to be avoided and that some types of cholesterol are not only good for your body, but actually necessary for it to subsist, the difference between what “good” and “bad” cholesterol is and the sources of these are still murky to some people.

Perhaps the most important thing to consider before delving into the discussion is that your body is an expert at regulating and balancing itself out. If you provide your body with organic, naturally occurring and healthy foods while veering away from the heavily processed and chemically imbalanced foods, your body will be able to take the material that it has been given and make it work so that your health and well-being still come out on top.

With this in mind, you may avoid eating eggs so that you don’t expose yourself to “high cholesterol.” You should realize, however, that your body needs cholesterol and that if this need is not fulfilled through your diet, then your body will simply make cholesterol for itself in order to maintain its necessary balance. So, eating eggs actually gives your body what it needs in terms of its cholesterol balance. In fact, it provides your body with more than just “balance”; eating eggs actually gives your body more good cholesterol, thus creating a better overall cholesterol ratio for your body.

Misconceptions of Eggs

It cannot be denied that, among all other staples of the breakfast table, eggs are able to prompt the most discussion. Though older beliefs strongly hold that eating multiple eggs or eating them daily is bad for your health, modern science has almost completely and unquestionably proven this belief wrong. Why then does this dated belief still hold so much ground in the modern day?

The misconceptions revolving around the healthiness of eggs and the kind of cholesterol they provide stem from a very flawed and old understanding of how calories, cholesterol, and our bodies work. Some time in the 1960’s to the 1970’s, heart disease and other cardiovascular illnesses had increased and had become disturbingly common in the United States.

This prompted multiple scientific queries into the foods and diets that contained the most cholesterol, which then spurred flawed and even unhealthy and potentially harmful dietary programs and beliefs. This was a result of an incomplete understanding of how our body consumes cholesterol and the different kinds of cholesterol there were (aside from eggs, coconut oil had also become an unfortunate target of the new found cholesterol hate, despite being healthy and beneficial).

However, as time went on, a better and more complete understanding of cholesterol and its role concerning our cardiovascular health developed and the unhealthy notions associated with eggs were generally proven false. Even without scientific backing, a simple survey of places and populations that have a high amount of egg in their daily diets shows that they are usually healthier than places without eggs in their diet. Though this could be a result of a myriad of other factors, at the very least it, shows that having egg regularly in your diet isn’t as bad as people often believe it to be.

Is the Yellow Stuff Bad?

It isn’t uncommon for someone cooking breakfast to cook some eggs while taking out the yolk, as some sort of compromise. This is usually done due to the belief that the yolk contains all of the unhealthy components of the egg, all the unwanted and undesirable “bad” cholesterol while the egg whites hold all of the healthy benefits hidden in eggs. However, it may shock you to discover that this is almost completely untrue. Though it is true that the egg whites contain some health benefits, this amount is almost negligible compared with the amount contained in the egg yolk.

Eggs are also considered to be one of the best sources of protein, which your body needs for different uses and functions.

Aside from containing most of the taste you get from an egg, the egg yolk also holds the most nutritional value inside the eggs and is, by far, the healthiest part of the entire egg. It contains the most nutrients, vitamins, and minerals that can be found in the egg, in addition to potent anti-oxidants. Eating only the egg whites under the guise of health is not only a waste of good egg yolk; it actually provides you with minimal health benefits.

So, the next time you have eggs for breakfast don’t shortchange yourself by removing the yolks in the hope that you’re eating healthier. You can keep the yolk while alleviating yourself of any guilt that may have been associated with it because now you know that yolks are actually good for you. You can have your cake (or egg) and eat it, too!

What to Look Out For When Purchasing Eggs?  

It almost goes without saying that when you do buy your eggs, it’s highly recommended that you buy organic and local. This is because eggs that were made by free range chickens have an incredible amount of vitamins and minerals to offer, putting its generic supermarket egg counterparts to shame. Aside from this, buying eggs produced by free range chickens also help safeguard you from a major health issue that usually concerns these animals. You greatly reduce the risk of eating an egg containing bacteria (salmonella, for instance) when you buy a free range egg instead of a supermarket one.

Additionally, in the case of eggs, you might be surprised to find out that sometimes what’s on the outside is just as important as what’s on the inside. Not only should you consider the actual egg when you are thinking about buying it, but you should also look at its exterior, the egg shell.

Though most people are familiar with egg shells being paper white, anyone who’s been to a chicken coop will know that the eggs actually come out as a more natural brown color, at first. How then, do they end up turning into the egg shell white that we are familiar with today?

First, it is important to know what an egg shell actually is. An egg shell is essentially more like our own skin, rather than some impenetrable wall or barrier. It has, in fact, thousands of pores which are covered by a protective cuticle. When this cuticle is removed, the pores are prone to attack from numerous sources of bacteria, and what goes into the pores will also go into the egg that we eat. This is important to remember as we discuss the cleaning process that eggs undergo before they can be sold.

Before the eggs go on supermarket shelves, they have to go through a process of cleaning. There are multiple methods of cleaning eggs, some of which can further solidify the integrity of the egg while others actual endanger it. Some processes make use of strong chemicals that you wouldn’t usually associate with consumption, such as mineral oil, chlorine, and rye. These methods are usually utilized by companies that produce large quantities of eggs for shipping into supermarkets.

So, it goes without saying that it is very important that the egg’s protective cuticle is maintained, right? Unfortunately, some of these cleaning methods actually remove the important protective cuticle, thus opening the inside of the egg to complications, as well as exposing itself to the very chemical (be it non-natural oil, chlorine, or rye) used to clean it.

However, local farmers and egg producers usually employ much more natural and safer ways to clean their eggs. Some employ a simple water rinse to clean the egg, others use vinegar (a much healthier and natural alternative to other chemicals) to ensure that it is without debris, while others use a simple dry brush method to sweep dirt off the egg.

The only way to really find out how the eggs you eat are cleaned is by asking the producers of the eggs regarding their preferred method of cleaning. This is why it is easier to ensure that your eggs were cleaned in a natural, environmentally friendly method when you buy from a local producer or farmer’s market, than when you buy in a big, corporate supermarket.

Breakfast with a Side of Eggs

Even though at this point, we have discussed and discovered how eggs are actually good for you and essential to your health and body’s wellness, it is equally important to have a realistic view of how eggs figure into our diet. Most of the time we eat eggs, if not all of the time, we do eat them for breakfast. More often than not, we pair eggs with other breakfast staples such as bacon, bagels, sausages, and pancakes.

When we do this, however, we are almost completely balancing out, if not outright tipping the scales in opposition to, the good cholesterol and all the benefits that eggs provide us against all of the unhealthy and potentially dangerous cholesterol and calories from other breakfast foods.

The truth is, a lot of breakfast foods are actually really unhealthy for you, no matter how scrumptious or comforting they might be. Even if you cut out all of the deep-fried meats and the sugary, sumptuous treats from your breakfast diet and settle for things like bagels and even cereals (depending on the type), these foods are still usually very unhealthy.

If you’re looking for some good food that you can pair up with eggs, then perhaps you should look into adding alkalizing foods into your diet. Some of these greens include vegetables such as cabbage, broccoli, carrots, turnips, Brussels sprouts, turnips, garlic, and many more.

You can also add a little tang to tickle your taste buds by including alkalizing fruits such as lemons, bananas, berries, apples, and the like, while making sure to avoid foods such as chocolate, dairy, coffee, alcohol, sweets, and sodas. Though doing so might be easier said than done, it is important to remember that this is  recommended to ensure that, not only are the great benefits of eating eggs not put to waste, but that you are able to regulate the chemical balance of your body in one quick and tasty swoop.

Sunny Side Up

There you have it, enough information on eggs to hopefully unscramble the confusion and reveal the sunny truth about this small but amazing food wonder. Now you know that though it does contain cholesterol, it is the good kind of cholesterol that your body needs. Add this to the knowledge that eggs actually come in originally brown shells and that you should always try to buy locally when you can. Appreciate the fact that some breakfast foods, though tasty, aren’t worth the well-being of your health, and that it’s alright (actually, it’s even recommended) that you leave the yolk in your eggs when you eat them.

As with everything else in life, it is of the utmost importance to remember that everything should be done and consumed with moderation and that if you do so, your body will thank you and will allow you to reap all of the benefits for a long time to come.

Now as you have learned that eggs will not affect your health as much as you used to think, you will be amazed to find out these 4 foods that will cause your body to be FAT, and most folks eat these 4 foods for breakfast.

Go to next page to watch the 4 Foods to NEVER eat for Breakfast <<

About the Author:

Emma Deangela is the best selling author of The Alkaline Diet Program and 80/20 Fat Loss. She has helped over tens of thousands of men and women to lose weight and transform their health with sound nutrition advice.

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51 Comments

  1. Nancy LNov 22, 2013 at 12:21 amReply

    The color of the egg has everything to do with the breed of chicken that laid it. For example, Leghorns lay white-shelled eggs, from the first egg to the last. White and brown shells are the most common, but I have also seen pale green, pale blue and an off-white from some of the “fancy” breeds of chicken.

    • carmellaDec 28, 2013 at 4:27 amReply

      years ago I saw a Martha Stewart show about eggs, and she brought in a few of her hens. she discussed that the color of the eggs is actually due to the ‘ear’ color of the hen and she showed the ears. It was cool. also if an egg is fresh and local and unwashed it has a protective coating which actually protects it from salmonella and bacteria. When we wash an egg in solution, it exposes it to bacteria and it easily gets in the pores of the egg.
      The egg white also has an enzyme that digests the yolk and vice versa, a raw egg is actually easier to digest, and in nature was eaten this way. In cooking, boiling will allow more bioavailable biotin, a necessary nutrient. great info all around, thanks for the article and for bringing up great points.

    • LynneMay 14, 2015 at 7:19 pmReply

      I have found the color of the chicken’s legs denote the color of it’s egg shell. Personally, I eat a raw egg smoothie every single day from my own chickens. Their eggs seldom have soil on them so I wait until I crack them to wash them. That preserves the little mucus shield that comes from the hen being disturbed. My 3 little girls forage from 1 til dusk and gleefully go back inside their lot and house. Included with my breakfast egg are carrot chunks, beet slices, 1/2 banana, blueberries, wheat germ, chia seed and pineapple juice.

  2. EmilyNov 22, 2013 at 12:46 amReply

    The color of the egg is determined by the breed of the chicken, NOT the method of washing. Some breeds lay white eggs…. some brown…. some blue/green….

  3. Paul E. Tooley SrNov 22, 2013 at 12:52 amReply

    To each his/her own when it comes to diet. However, having said that, I must say I appreciate very much the researched information concerning the use of eggs in one’s diet. The information is extremely beneficial to those of us who find useful the studies about diet as a supplement of good information for our religious beliefs, as well as for those who just desire a long, happy, enjoyable life. Dietary laws govern each human, along with cogent information about other things many folks use such as tobacco, liquor,and dope. Thanks for the information about eggs.

  4. Alva June SchmidtNov 22, 2013 at 4:36 amReply

    Thank you for sharing your information about eggs.

  5. Alton FinchNov 22, 2013 at 6:32 amReply

    My Father was a poultryman so as a child I ate MANY eggs and still do. I am 94 years old and eating eggs hasn’t hurt me yet.

    • Kathy CrispiDec 1, 2015 at 8:42 pmReply

      94 years young!
      Ate Eggs all your life.
      Goes to show….there I no right or wrong way to eat the incredible edible Egg!

      • JoyceApr 4, 2016 at 12:56 amReply

        Well Kathy! Another proof that should be eggs are a Part of Every ones diet! Thanks

    • JoyceApr 4, 2016 at 12:53 amReply

      Glad you gave us this information Alton! You have proved to me that Eating Eggs is perfectly ok ! Everything in Moderation…..Thanks!

  6. Rick MorganNov 22, 2013 at 8:28 amReply

    I do find this article most informative and am going to forward it to others.
    Thanks Emma

    Could you talk about coffee sometime…. I drink a lot… no cream or sugar, but I do love my coffee.
    Rick

  7. LenaNov 25, 2013 at 11:07 pmReply

    Thank you Emma…this information is very valuable for me and my family . I will share it with others.

  8. Lena WilliamsNov 25, 2013 at 11:09 pmReply

    Thank you Emma. This is great information. I will share this with my family and others.

  9. juan EmmanuelliNov 26, 2013 at 7:21 amReply

    I tried to buy program and me e-mail was rejected

  10. Sharon CarrollNov 26, 2013 at 9:15 amReply

    What about the substance “Choline” I’ve been hearing so much about. It being a potential Cancer causing substance….

  11. DebbieDec 10, 2013 at 11:31 pmReply

    I’m so glad to hear this news about eggs! I was just having a discussion about yolks the other day. People have been eating eggs for many, many years, so it’s great to know eggs are on the “good” list again.

  12. vitaJan 18, 2014 at 1:25 amReply

    Good article my hens are organically fed and we love to eat eggs everyday…

  13. Mrs. Debra ReevesMar 5, 2014 at 9:17 amReply

    Thank Goodness something is good to eat so many bad foods out there eggs are also great for diets helps us keep our shapes.

  14. DarrellApr 9, 2014 at 8:55 amReply

    I pretty much ignore the ‘so-called evils of certain foods’. My dad ate eggs, sausage, bacon, red meat, etc his entire life. He was 93 when he passed away. I was raised on eggs, red meat, salt, etc. I still eat them. My choleosterol is low, my triglycerides are low, my blood pressure is normal. So much for the evils of salt, red meat, and eggs.

  15. D RMay 22, 2014 at 1:00 pmReply

    My doctor told me to cut out foods high in sulfa for a few weeks and (eggs are very high) because my dhea hormone was super high and my body is very acidic she says you have to cut the God out for a while. Like the onions broccoli cauliflower cabbage and more are really high in sulfa. Its all so confusing but I guess each individual has to do what is best for them depending on what’s going on with their body.

  16. Pol KeeJun 8, 2014 at 3:44 amReply

    I have been eating one organic egg every morning fried sunny side up in virgin coconut oil for over seven years.
    My most recent cholesterol reading this past March was Total-153. LDL-63. HDL-82. Triglycerides-60.
    I’m 65 years old.
    So for me it seems eggs are not a problem.
    And, I am happy about that because I love the smell of an egg frying and really enjoy eating them.

  17. ART GRIGGJun 27, 2014 at 1:58 amReply

    Recently I read an article that said to eat eggs raw for best results. Even hard boiled eggs are not recommended. Litely poached is better than hard boiled. Fried not good. Also I researched vitamins and discovered that eggs have the largest number of different vitamins of any food source. I am beginning to mix an egg in my midday salad with coleslaw as a base with plain yogurt stirred in, along with an apple and good nuts such as walnut, cashews and raw almonds. The yogurt takes the place of mayo, at least psychologically, but better for you.

  18. bobmDec 3, 2014 at 2:19 amReply

    This article assumes that eating cholesterol is connected with the cholesterol levels in the body, which has been disputed. I enjoy my local eggs, much better for me than breakfast cereals, which are guaranteed to contain toxins from the corn, soy and wheat.

  19. Lucille richDec 14, 2014 at 5:54 pmReply

    i was also suprised about your info on color of eggs. I have different breeds of chickens who lay brown, blue, green and pure white eggs……all taste the same (of course)……all with same nutritional content. The white eggs are pure white with no hint of brown…..where did you get the information?

  20. Leonard M. SchwabDec 29, 2014 at 5:06 amReply

    Egg yolks contain sufficient lecithin to neutralize the cholesterol in the egg. The boiling point of lecithin is about 215 deg F. Eggs eaten raw or cooked sunny side up or soft boiled preserve the lecithin. Scrambled or hard boiled eggs usually reach temperatures above 215 F when the lecithin is boiled off, i.e. the health benefit of the natural lecithin is lost.

  21. Little Bright FeatherJan 30, 2015 at 7:38 amReply

    There are eggs, and then there are EGGS ! I’ve been a chicken rancher since i as 2 my Dad’s chicken ranch – I’m a 5th generation chicken rancher. I’m also a bio-Chemic Nutritionist.
    I know health doctors that eat a doz eggs a day, but not the ones from the store from the govt run commercial farms. I’d never eat or use an egg if that is all I had were the store govt eggs.
    Even the “organic eggs in the stores ” have lost their “naturalness” once they are washed with the chemical and bleaches all store eggs are washed with.
    And REAL organic eggs will all be fertile eggs = living food.
    Store eggs are dead eggs – a dead food.
    Fertile eggs also have no bad cholesterol in them.
    Sterile eggs do. I know my business.
    And then what you feed them and how you house the chickens mean a lot too. You need to know what you are doing. I’ve been doing this nearly 70 years.

    As I said, there are eggs and then there are EGGS !

    And how they are prepared also has a lot to do with getting the most nutrition from them.
    Personally I like mine raw in shakes.

    • YvonneSep 24, 2015 at 3:12 amReply

      do you keep your eggs refrigerated at all times?

  22. Little Bright FeatherJan 30, 2015 at 7:44 amReply

    By the way, your brain needs cholesterol to function. Cholesterol is not bad – you need the good cholesterol, and if your cholesterol level goes too low, it is dangerous. Remember who the doctors are trained by ! Doctors know little to nothing about nutrition.

    • JoyceApr 4, 2016 at 1:00 amReply

      Maybe this is why so many are getting Alheimers!!!Not enough Eggs!

  23. Steve RJan 31, 2015 at 5:27 amReply

    Too much misinformation here. Humans do not NEED to consume any cholesterol at all. We make it in completely sufficient quantities without sacrificing any other health aspect. Why would you imply otherwise? The fact is that different people react differently to cholesterol ingestion. Some tolerate it well while others are better suited to minimize it. Anectdotal evidence is insufficient to support far reaching conclusions.

  24. Dennis McKeeApr 15, 2015 at 9:58 pmReply

    I still believe eggs are still one of the near perfect food that God has put here. In everything we always seen to fair better if we live in moderation to what we do eat. After heart surgery and studing the new type Doctors on health living. I believe we need to watch sugar first, saturated fat and then sodium intake. These tend to do more damage. Watching the type of carbs is next. and exercise may be the most important to health living and protecting this house we reside in. Thank you for the information and research you provide.

  25. MichaelMay 2, 2015 at 9:57 pmReply

    There are other key issues not fully presented:
    1) How many times a week do you eat eggs? – I used to eat 3 egg omelets 5-6 times a week. Good or Bad?
    2) Whether it is at home or a restaurant what are eggs cooked in? bacon fat, vegetable oil? other oils or grease?
    3) Breakfast should and must be the largest meal of a day but 3 eggs on the side? with sausage, potatoes and ALSO your ‘breakfast’?? A person has either maxed or nearly reached their DAILY fat requirements in one meal!!! I do no care whether it is go or bad fats and oils. FAT is FAT and must be taken in moderation.

  26. AlineJul 7, 2015 at 2:33 pmReply

    We love our boiled egg and 2 toasts everyday! we are fine! eggs give us strenghts.

  27. DeborahAug 18, 2015 at 7:14 amReply

    I am on a life changing diet and I can eat eggs. I do not eat them every day. Thank you for the information on the eggs and I enjoyed reading everyone’s comments.

  28. jeff nDec 22, 2015 at 2:57 pmReply

    This article is full of misinformation. Eggs are not nutritious, healthy, nor all that high in protein. One egg has more cholesterol than a Big Mac. Research it for yourself. I’m surprised the author posted this. Usually her articles are quite good. This one is a disaster.

    • DorothyDec 25, 2015 at 4:44 pmReply

      Does Jeff know how to read? How could he dispute all the facts spelled out for him?

    • ROSEMARY FERRERMay 27, 2016 at 1:17 amReply

      Jeff, with all due respect for your reply, i think you should reevaluate your response first before posting it. It seems your research is only through your own lenses. Get grip of reality, Jeff. Try eating it when you couldn’t sleep after this comment. BTW, BIG Mack is not much of a diet for those who don’t like home cook meal! And don’t have the time to cook due to poor life choices e.g. not eating good nutritious food… like eggs.

  29. MaryJan 8, 2016 at 1:09 pmReply

    Jeff, you are drinking tke kool-aid!!! You are way behind the times! My cholesterol was too high, and when I started eating eggs again, and allowed myself a reasonable amount of fat, my cholesterol went down!!! All the new info will tell you eggs are good and some fat is ok. And most of all, coconut oil is almost a cure all!!!

    Get back in touch with what is good for you!

  30. Jim LynchApr 16, 2016 at 6:48 pmReply

    Great article and really good comments. That is until Jeff showed up – lol. I find what has been shared fascinating and up until now was egg-ignorant with regard to the colors, protective coatings, washing and chemicals.

  31. ROSEMARY FERRERMay 27, 2016 at 1:11 amReply

    Eggs are healthy as i believe even before this article. However, this article of Emma proves true of my belief that eggs are healthy. i slept better in the evening if i eat two scrambled egg at night time. Protein rich!!! Brown or white shells don’t make any difference…they are still good eggs. To know if the eggs you buy are fresh.. let m e share my experience with you as i was growing up in Cebu, Phil.. Every now and then my mother had egg vendors from the mountain top and would come down to the city to barter their farm produce like eggs, mangoes, vegetables, etc. with clothes and other useful stuff for their children/family. To test how long the eggs have been picked from their farm, my mom would have a small basin of cold water and placed two or three eggs at a time. If they float that mean they are fresh, if they sink into the water they are not fresh and have been picked for quite a while. So my mom knew what eggs need to be used for the barter process. BTW, egg whites are also good to use as mask if you still want to separate the egg yolk and white part of the egg.. Apply it over your face and neck 30 min before you wash or shower time. Enjoy the eggs. They are good for you!

    • CorAug 23, 2016 at 6:00 pmReply

      Hi,
      sorry to say – old eggs float and fresh eggs sink.

  32. Solomon ElmoreJun 26, 2016 at 3:20 amReply

    I thank you for all the good information about eggs. There are a lot of opinions about what is good and what is bad in eggs, the information you provided has helped me realized that maybe eggs are not as bad as some of the other articles. It is good to know about the good cholesterol in eggs and it’s a blessing to know that I get good cholesterol in my organic, range free eggs that I have been eating. I had almost stopped eating eggs because of the bad things said about them, but will now be eating more of the “good eggs”. I have purchased eggs in the store in the past, but have been eating only eggs from a local farmer for about 2 years now. Your article supports my decision to “go local”. Many, many thanks.

  33. MsttJul 20, 2016 at 4:33 pmReply

    So true, you can’t skip the ethics.

  34. Elizabeth CookAug 28, 2016 at 10:50 amReply

    My Buff Orpington hens lay light-to-dark brown eggs. The mixed breed hens lay white, brown, and tan eggs. The misinformation about the eggshell color casts some doubt on your other information..

  35. JaneOct 4, 2016 at 10:13 pmReply

    What about vegetarians.. Is eating an egg really cruel…taking of a life??? a very interesting and normative article.

  36. JaneOct 4, 2016 at 10:14 pmReply

    informative… sorry not normative…spell check error. lol

  37. EmilyFeb 3, 2017 at 1:52 amReply

    Well if anyone has lived overseas like I have and seen the malnutrition in kids and adults from lack of protein and cholesterol you would understand. Women need cholesterol to make hormones and hormones make babies! Without it we would become infertile and end humanity. Yes our bodies make cholesterol but very small amounts and fat is needed to process it. I had no eggs or cholesterol in my diet for 5 years and my body stopped making hormones. In my 20’s I messed up my ovaries and had to have them removed. Went down to 70 pound and finally discovered eating eggs again rebuilt my energy, color to skin, and pain in joints. Gained normal weight back and compulsive disorder went away. We need cholesterol in form of eggs or animals to survive!! Explains why we are all getting demencia in our 30’s, osteoporosis, and depressed. We our ruining ourselves by worrying to much
    about fat. Fat is good in small amounts, partly cooked to not ruin the clotting process, and to oil our brains!!!

  38. Damian QuijadaFeb 19, 2017 at 8:42 pmReply

    I love eggs ,no matter how their cooked or uncooked !!! I eat 2 eggs every day ever since i worked for Safeway egg plant in Riverside Cal. in 1969 . They have one of the highest standards in the industry . And by he way ,my annual physical is always a 10 . Thank you for the article , i’ll have to mention his info . to my co-workers .

  39. joe baloneMay 6, 2017 at 8:53 pmReply

    SteveR,
    thank you for the best , logical comment!
    every person has a different genetic base. away from eggs, in general, some people smoke 60 cigarets a day and are healthy in their 80. Some are dead in their 40. I, and my wife eat the same food for 45 years. I have a high cholesterol, no matter what I eat, her chol. level is perfect, no matter what she eats. etc., etc.

  40. DeborahJun 14, 2017 at 8:43 amReply

    Is eating raw eggs harmful?

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